0626 Looking Back

Anacortes American editorial cartoon from June 30, 1949

June 29, 1899

The proposal of the council to tear up sixteen feet of the planking in the center of P avenue and in place of it to put gravel is meeting with some opposition … from merchants doing business on that street and also from owners of property fronting thereon.

The objections to the change are many and varied. It is urged that the street, while of course not now in good condition, might be much worse, and that at trifling expense the broken and worn out planks could be replaced with new ones. In this way the present planking could be made to hold out at least one, and possibly two years longer. And by that time the abutting property owners would probably be in position to decide upon some permanent pavement for the street, whereas the improvement proposed by the council is makeshift and temporary in character. …

To adopt the change proposed would delay the permanent paving of the street. Let us practice economy a little while longer, until we are fairly out of the woods financially, and then pave P avenue properly.

July 1, 1909

Popularity of motor boating in Anacortes is spreading, and while many fine new boats have been built or are now under construction, many others are planned and talked about. The most notable motor boat launched this week is the 42-foot power boat Nautilus, built by and for R. E. Trafton & Co., and slipped into the water at the foot of O avenue on Tuesday evening. She is 42 feet long, 10.6 feet beam, draws 3.6 feet of water and has a 30-horsepower Buffalo gasoline engine. … She is a handsome service boat and cost $3,000.

Lea E. Dodge made up his mind some time ago that he could go elsewhere and get a boat built that would run rings around the other semi-speed boats of Anacortes, so he had a hull of the torpedo-stern, semi-speed model built by some boat builders on Lopez island and then had her taken to Bellingham for an engine and machinery. A 12-horsepower 4-cycle Burpee & Letson engine was installed. Lea christened her by forming a name out of the initials of his little son, Gordon, calling the new speeder “Gad.” … The Gad is 26.4 feet long and 4.8 feet in breadth. …

C. C. Keesling has rebuilt his old fishing sloop and has made her an auxiliary cruiser, remodeled and equipped with a 10-horsepower Holliday engine, and she will probably be launched this afternoon. He has named her the Newmay. She is 28.6 feet long and very easily planned for pleasure cruising.

July 3, 1919

The fire truck, with five firemen aboard, turned over while rounding a corner at 26th and Commercial Friday afternoon, but no one was injured, and no damage was done to the truck except the bending of the fenders a little.

The jitney bus was crossing the street down which the truck had to turn as the truck reached the corner. In attempting to make the turn and clear the bus the truck struck a pile of dirt left in the street near the sidewalk and rolled over on its side. Truck Driver E. G. Ratliff, Fire Chief Tom Conway, Fred Fisher, Russell Smith and Alex Latshaw, who were riding on the truck, were thrown out, but all escaped injury.

The firemen and spectators succeeded in righting the truck after the hose had been taken out. … But the fire at the Anacortes Lumber & Shingle Company, the old red Cedar plant, was put out almost immediately after it was reported, and the truck did not have to finish the run.

June 27, 1929

Calling attention to the fact that the use of firecrackers in Anacortes is unlawful, Tom Conway, chief of the fire department, issues the following warning:

“The use of firecrackers is unlawful and below you will find a city ordinance which covers this subject, and which will be enforced this year:

“It provides a penalty of not less than a fine of five dollars nor more than one hundred dollars.”

June 29, 1939

Work at the two Foss Shingle mills in Anacortes was seen as a probability shortly after the Fourth of July, in an announcement released today by Russell Mokler, shingle weaver’s union representative of Anacortes.

An important meeting of all shingle workers formerly employed at the two mills will be held this Sunday, starting at 10 a.m. and a cooperative plan, that it is believed will be acted on favorably, will be presented to the men.

The plan that will be presented to the shingle men will be that the workers lease the mills and work them on a cooperative basis.

June 30, 1949

The Fourth of July holidays in 1948 cost the people of the State of Washington $263,000 as a result of rural motor vehicle traffic accidents. These same days of bands and banners, firecrackers and fun claimed the lives of six persons and brought pain and suffering to many more of Washington’s citizens.

The causes of the wanton waste of money and manpower can be laid at the door of motorists who violated the trust of good judgment and responsibility while operating their vehicles on our streets and highways …; 58% of these motorists were between the ages of twenty and forty-four, and 10% were under nineteen years of age.

One accident out of every four points to a personal indiscretion on the part of the driver involved.

July 1, 1959

City construction jobs are proceeding ahead of schedule generally, reports City Manager Archie French.

The J Avenue sanitary sewers will be in well before our Sept. 1 completion date,” he said. Over 1,600 feet of pipe out of a scheduled 2,500 to go in has been laid in less than a month. Seven manholes also will be sunk along the sewer route.

Meanwhile, engineering and field surveying on the controversial 9th Street paving plan have been completed, and “we are going full time on designing line and grade of the pavement,” remarked French.

June 26, 1969

Anacortes Chamber of Commerce members will take additional action to end the “overtime” inspection fee now charged boaters and flyers returning from Canada.

Both the United States Customs and Immigration Services now impose an overtime fee for Sunday and holiday clearance of private boats and planes reentering the United States.

This fee is based upon the overtime salary of the inspector called out and can be as high as $80, depending upon the officer’s salary classification.

If more than one vessel is cleared during the same eight-hour overtime period the fee is pro-rated, causing an even wider variance in the amount a single boater or pilot is forced to pay.

June 27, 1979

A building permit surcharge that would help pay city costs related to residential development is being considered by city council.

In a study session Monday, council selected councilman Otis Piburn to work with city attorney Steve Mansfield in drafting a resolution establishing such a surcharge.

June 28, 1989

The Lady of the Sea statue committee, through its artists’ jury group, has chosen two finalists for the project.

Deborah Copenhaver of Spokane and Jane Horns Mitchell of the Port Townsend Blue Heron Foundry now will create 36-inch models of their submissions. The final decision will be made in September, according to statue members.

“I am comfortable with the jury’s recommendations, considering all the factors,” Ray Separovich said. He serves as committee chairman.

June 29, 1899

The proposal of the council to tear up sixteen feet of the planking in the center of P avenue and in place of it to put gravel is meeting with some opposition … from merchants doing business on that street and also from owners of property fronting thereon.

The objections to the change are many and varied. It is urged that the street, while of course not now in good condition, might be much worse, and that at trifling expense the broken and worn out planks could be replaced with new ones. In this way the present planking could be made to hold out at least one, and possibly two years longer. And by that time the abutting property owners would probably be in position to decide upon some permanent pavement for the street, whereas the improvement proposed by the council is makeshift and temporary in character. …

To adopt the change proposed would delay the permanent paving of the street. Let us practice economy a little while longer, until we are fairly out of the woods financially, and then pave P avenue properly.

July 1, 1909

Popularity of motor boating in Anacortes is spreading, and while many fine new boats have been built or are now under construction, many others are planned and talked about. The most notable motor boat launched this week is the 42-foot power boat Nautilus, built by and for R. E. Trafton & Co., and slipped into the water at the foot of O avenue on Tuesday evening. She is 42 feet long, 10.6 feet beam, draws 3.6 feet of water and has a 30-horsepower Buffalo gasoline engine. … She is a handsome service boat and cost $3,000.

Lea E. Dodge made up his mind some time ago that he could go elsewhere and get a boat built that would run rings around the other semi-speed boats of Anacortes, so he had a hull of the torpedo-stern, semi-speed model built by some boat builders on Lopez island and then had her taken to Bellingham for an engine and machinery. A 12-horsepower 4-cycle Burpee & Letson engine was installed. Lea christened her by forming a name out of the initials of his little son, Gordon, calling the new speeder “Gad.” … The Gad is 26.4 feet long and 4.8 feet in breadth. …

C. C. Keesling has rebuilt his old fishing sloop and has made her an auxiliary cruiser, remodeled and equipped with a 10-horsepower Holliday engine, and she will probably be launched this afternoon. He has named her the Newmay. She is 28.6 feet long and very easily planned for pleasure cruising.

July 3, 1919

The fire truck, with five firemen aboard, turned over while rounding a corner at 26th and Commercial Friday afternoon, but no one was injured, and no damage was done to the truck except the bending of the fenders a little.

The jitney bus was crossing the street down which the truck had to turn as the truck reached the corner. In attempting to make the turn and clear the bus the truck struck a pile of dirt left in the street near the sidewalk and rolled over on its side. Truck Driver E. G. Ratliff, Fire Chief Tom Conway, Fred Fisher, Russell Smith and Alex Latshaw, who were riding on the truck, were thrown out, but all escaped injury.

The firemen and spectators succeeded in righting the truck after the hose had been taken out. … But the fire at the Anacortes Lumber & Shingle Company, the old red Cedar plant, was put out almost immediately after it was reported, and the truck did not have to finish the run.

June 27, 1929

Calling attention to the fact that the use of firecrackers in Anacortes is unlawful, Tom Conway, chief of the fire department, issues the following warning:

“The use of firecrackers is unlawful and below you will find a city ordinance which covers this subject, and which will be enforced this year:

“It provides a penalty of not less than a fine of five dollars nor more than one hundred dollars.”

June 29, 1939

Work at the two Foss Shingle mills in Anacortes was seen as a probability shortly after the Fourth of July, in an announcement released today by Russell Mokler, shingle weaver’s union representative of Anacortes.

An important meeting of all shingle workers formerly employed at the two mills will be held this Sunday, starting at 10 a.m. and a cooperative plan, that it is believed will be acted on favorably, will be presented to the men.

The plan that will be presented to the shingle men will be that the workers lease the mills and work them on a cooperative basis.

June 30, 1949

The Fourth of July holidays in 1948 cost the people of the State of Washington $263,000 as a result of rural motor vehicle traffic accidents. These same days of bands and banners, firecrackers and fun claimed the lives of six persons and brought pain and suffering to many more of Washington’s citizens.

The causes of the wanton waste of money and manpower can be laid at the door of motorists who violated the trust of good judgment and responsibility while operating their vehicles on our streets and highways …; 58% of these motorists were between the ages of twenty and forty-four, and 10% were under nineteen years of age.

One accident out of every four points to a personal indiscretion on the part of the driver involved.

July 1, 1959

City construction jobs are proceeding ahead of schedule generally, reports City Manager Archie French.

The J Avenue sanitary sewers will be in well before our Sept. 1 completion date,” he said. Over 1,600 feet of pipe out of a scheduled 2,500 to go in has been laid in less than a month. Seven manholes also will be sunk along the sewer route.

Meanwhile, engineering and field surveying on the controversial 9th Street paving plan have been completed, and “we are going full time on designing line and grade of the pavement,” remarked French.

June 26, 1969

Anacortes Chamber of Commerce members will take additional action to end the “overtime” inspection fee now charged boaters and flyers returning from Canada.

Both the United States Customs and Immigration Services now impose an overtime fee for Sunday and holiday clearance of private boats and planes reentering the United States.

This fee is based upon the overtime salary of the inspector called out and can be as high as $80, depending upon the officer’s salary classification.

If more than one vessel is cleared during the same eight-hour overtime period the fee is pro-rated, causing an even wider variance in the amount a single boater or pilot is forced to pay.

June 27, 1979

A building permit surcharge that would help pay city costs related to residential development is being considered by city council.

In a study session Monday, council selected councilman Otis Piburn to work with city attorney Steve Mansfield in drafting a resolution establishing such a surcharge.

June 28, 1989

The Lady of the Sea statue committee, through its artists’ jury group, has chosen two finalists for the project.

Deborah Copenhaver of Spokane and Jane Horns Mitchell of the Port Townsend Blue Heron Foundry now will create 36-inch models of their submissions. The final decision will be made in September, according to statue members.

“I am comfortable with the jury’s recommendations, considering all the factors,” Ray Separovich said. He serves as committee chairman.

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