MOUNT VERNON — Hundreds of flags have been set up on the lawn outside Hospice of the Northwest.

The flag garden is in memory of military veterans who died in the past decade while in the care of Hospice of the Northwest.

The flag garden — at 227 Freeway Drive in Mount Vernon — will remain in place until Tuesday.

“It’s really important for our team to, one, spread the word on how to celebrate Memorial Day and why the flag is symbolic of Memorial Day,” said Erin Long, volunteer services manager for Hospice of the Northwest.

It’s the second year Hospice of the Northwest has honored veterans with a flag garden.

The flags were installed by staff and volunteers, who adhered both to COVID-19 and flag protocols.

“There is always a breeze along the river,” Long said. “It’s just an amazing scene.”

The flags were placed with precision, much like those placed at the final resting places for veterans.

“We have hundreds of tiny flags,” Long said. “Over the past 10 years, we had served over 690 veterans, which is a pretty astounding number for us.”

Accompanying the flags are yard signs and banners explaining the garden of red, white and blue.

“We learned quite a bit last year,” Long said. “This year alone, since May 1 of 2019 through April 30 of 2020, Hospice of the Northwest has served 154 veterans who have passed while on our service.

“Those are strictly military veterans, it includes all branches, including reserves. It’s really a touching time. It’s also an opportunity to remember, recognize and honor those veterans’ service to our country.”

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